Tag Archives: fail

When is selling add-ons pushy sales and when is it great service?

A popular way to  increase sales in retail is selling extras, attachment sales, accessories or linked product.  We know that, but it can often feel clumsy, pushy or a little awkward.

I though I’d share a Sales Fail of my own in terms of add-on selling and what can be learnt from it.

In 1996 I was working as a sales guy in a retail store and mail order telesales team.  I received a call in the morning from a guy 2 hours away who wanted to try a product.  It was a Synthesiser costing £2,595.  We arranged a demo time and I got everything set-up before he arrived.

The demo went well, it was rehearsed so I could respond to the needs and questions of the customer – but still ensure my party pieces and wow-factor features could be demonstrated.  Suffices to say, he bought the Synthesiser.  So far so good.

I processed the invoice, carried the product to his car and waved him on his way.  A job well done I thought.

3 hours later I get a call from the customer, naturally I assumed he would be gushing with how fantastic the experience was and how great my customer service was.  I couldn’t have been be further from the truth…the guy was furious.

Angry Customer Sales Fail

What you may not realise is that a professional synthesiser does not come with speakers, cables, pedals, headphones or a stand.  You might expect a professional to have these, or at least some of them.  In this instance, the customer had none of these, and had arrived home with his new investment and couldn’t even hear it.  To be precise, he’d done a 5 hour round trip, spent £2,595 and couldn’t play a note.

It was at this point that I realised that selling add-ons and accessories does not have to be perceived as being a pushy or greedy sales person.  It can be exceptional customer service.  IN fact, not selling this customer the extras to go with his product did him an injustice.  From this day onwards, if I hadn’t raised the topic of essential accessories or perfect partner products before we got to the counter (which we should do where possible), I would at least ask the question…“Can I check you have everything you need.  I would hate you to get home and not be able to use this?”

Presented is this way, the question feels like great customer service rather than a sales pitch.

Car dealerships go further, often completing a sign-over document to ensure you have been offered everything.  Is this in the interest of the customer or a prompt for the salesman?  When presented well it can work for both.

Tip: Never let a customer leave your store with a purchase, until you have “checked they have everything they need”.

To receive more sales tips and tricks in your mailbox, signup now.